Hungry in Budapest? Sample the Street Food

One of the best parts of discovering a new country is trying the cuisine. As much as I like to plan out my days to see all the most significant tourist spots in each city, I also love to discover a place from the lens of their local street foods.

I recently returned from Budapest, Hungary and while I made sure to try traditional favorites such as Hungarian Goulash and Chicken Paprikash, I also ventured to the street to get a taste of some of the popular fare. The best part? These stalls don’t require reservations.

Karavan Food Truck Garden

While touring the Jewish Quarter, I came across a food truck garden named KARAVAN. Luckily, I happened to stroll by right around lunchtime, and I decided to check out a fried bread, cheese-topped, dish called Langos. Langos starts with a dough (flour, yeast, salt, and water). After the dough rises, the mixture is shaped into balls. When you place an order, the balls are flattened into a disk and then fried in sunflower oil. Once the bread is golden brown, it is slathered with garlic butter, topped with sour cream and a decent amount of a mild grated cheese. I was amazed at how good this simple grub tasted. It is really filling and is big enough to share with friends, especially if you want to save room for more street food. It is prevalent all over the city, and while it is consistent in preparation, every vendor puts their own twist on it. At this food truck, you could get a burger between two pieces of Langos. No matter how you choose to eat it, it is something you have to try.

Langos Food TruckThis food truck will also make a burger out of two enormous disks, but I decided to try the original and save room for a sandwich from an innovative street food place called Bors.

BorsBors Gastro Bar is all about the pressed panini served on hollowed out baguette. The choices change weekly and each version offers a unique twist on the usual sandwich. The line can stretch down the block at this tiny, quirky, establishment. There are no tables, but there is a flatbed truck where patrons sit just beyond the door on the sidewalk. If you can grab a seat, you can relax and dig into your selection. They specialize in International, European street food and innovative soups. At Bors, you can also find vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options.  I shared a green curry chicken sandwich that was slightly spicy, warm and toasty. It was delicious. If you find yourself in the Jewish Quarter, head to Kazinczy street and get one of their signature creations.

If you are ready for something sweet, you have to try a Sekler Cake aka chimney cake. A traditional wedding pastry that hails from Romania, it is popular around Central Europe. There are stalls all around Budapest so you won’t have too much trouble finding a spot to get some of this warm, cone-like cake that is rolled over hot coals until it turns golden brown. Once the cake comes off the grill, it is sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. After it cools, you can choose how to fill it. Typical fillings include ice-creams, sauces, and toppings to put inside the cake. The dough is slightly sweet and remains chewy even though it is roasted over coals. It is similar to an ice-cream cone, but the cone is soft. Once you scoop out all the delicious filling, you tear pieces of the cake apart and eat that too. Absolute heaven.

Whenever I travel, I always check out the food scene to get the full picture of the culture and the traditions of each place. I find it so interesting to discover what the locals like to eat and I have had memorable food experiences every place I have visited. If you get to Budapest or if you have been there, drop a comment and let me know some of your favorite Hungarian dishes.

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